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Men's motoring manoeuvres suffer with sight of higher hemlines

Men's motoring manoeuvres suffer with sight of higher hemlines

A combination of an inability to multi-task and a need to fiddle with in car gadgets is making men a danger behind the wheel. Research by Saga Car Insurance shows two thirds of men over 50 admit to having been distracted behind the wheel in the last 12 months, compared to half of women.

The most common things that distract drivers are looking at views or landmarks (30%), changing radio stations or CDs (21%) and using Sat Navs (20%), with men significantly more likely to be distracted than women. As well as being twice as likely to be distracted by programming Sat Navs (men 23%, women 13%), and rubber necking (men 15%, women 9%), men are also more likely to channel hop for a good tune (men 24%, women 18%).

However, men's love of technology isn't their only downfall when it comes to driving, as a quarter of men admit to ogling attractive passers-by, while only 1% of women say their eyes have momentarily wandered off the road and on to a hottie.
 
While being distracted at the wheel can be an inconvenience, with two fifths of drivers missing turnings, being distracted can also be dangerous. A fifth of distracted drivers have nearly had an accident, one in ten have been so preoccupied with other things that they have mounted a curb and the same number of people have run a red light.

Paul Green, Saga's Director of Communication said: "Driving is like second nature to most of us and we forget about the risks of getting behind the wheel. So many modern cars are filled with gadgets to make drivers and passengers more comfortable.

"Even the best drivers could inadvertently cause an accident whilst distracted at the wheel, so making sure you have a good comprehensive insurance policy in place to cover any eventuality is essential.

"But the best advice to drivers is to stay safe and don't be an in-car fiddler. Driver's should programme Sat Navs before they set off so they can give the road their undivided attention."

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George Bailey